# Monday, 02 February 2009

In intensive care - but don't worry, it's not that serious!

Chaya Devoira was transferred to the intensive care unit (ICU) this morning. Before you panic, this was only because they didn't have a bed in the high dependency unit (HDU) where she went the last couple of times. Just like before, her breathing became more difficult as the virus/infection set in, and she got to the stage where they wanted to put her on to the SiPAP machine that pumps the oxygen into her at a sufficient pressure to keep her lungs open. They would normally have done this in HDU, but they didn't have any beds, so she went into ICU instead.

Now, I'm pleased to be able to say that I've never had the need to see inside an ICU before. Having seen the HDU, and knowing that ICU is one step up in care from HDU, I imagined that ICU would be a very silent place, where each bed was in its own cubicle, where the nurses crept around and spoke in hushed tones, and the inert patients would lie semi-comatose in their beds, each hooked up to a wealth of serious-looking machines.

Hah, was I ever wrong! Talk about noisy! It was more like an open ward, albeit with rather more security on the door, but with loads of people bustling around. True, there were more machines than I'd seen in one place before, but the majority of these were familiar to me from other wards.

Anyway, right in the middle of it all was Chaya Devoira, with her strange mask on and the SiPAP bubbling away (it removes the moisture from the oxygen before shoving it up her nose, as it wouldn't be too pleasant having a nose full of water!). She was calm and drowsy, although it turned out that this was due to heavy sedation.

All in all, she is doing fine. They slowly reduced the oxygen levels during the day, but she is still on 35% oxygen, which is quite a lot higher than the 21% in normal air. They aren't in a hurry to get her off the SiPAP, as they would prefer to make sure she's really better first. Sounds good to me.

The cardiologist came round while I was there, and we asked him how this would affect her operation. He said that it depends on whether she has a virus or an infection. If it's a virus, then they will want to leave her for a couple of weeks before operating. If it's bacterial, then they can go ahead straight away.

It turns out that Guys hospital, where she is to have the operation, currently has a very short waiting list, and they were going to ring us on Sunday to ask her to take Chaya Devoira down, so they could operate today! As she was admitted on Shabbos, this never happened.

It seems that if she has an infection, they could call us at any time for the operation. This is good, in that she should get seen sooner, but it puts us on alert pretty much the whole time, which is quite a strain. It also brings the whole thing more closely into reality, which had to happen some time or other. Subconsciously, I think we were putting off the thought. Looks like we can't now!

Anyway, no more news for now. IY"H she will be home soon, but we'll see.

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